Proposed nuclear waste facility attracts spray-on protest - and more 10am Zedlines

Opponents of the proposed nuclear waste facility southwest of Warwick have taken their protests to the streets with graffiti, spray-painting roads and industrial bins with their message. ( image source: Warrick Daily News)

In local news…

Proposed nuclear waste facility attracts spray-on protest

Opponents of the proposed nuclear waste facility southwest of Warwick have taken their protests to the streets with graffiti, spray-painting roads and industrial bins with their message.

Police are investigating the incident in Oman Ama, where the facility is under consideration, with Sergeant Tim Hoffmann acknowledging the issue has raised a passionate response.

Anti-nuclear group Friends of Oman Ama have condemned the action, saying graffiti is not an appropriate protest.

Linc Energy face allegations of “irreversible” harm

The Queensland Government are set to accuse Linc Energy, a coal gasification company operating outside Chinchilla, of contaminating the land and irreversibly harming the environment.

Linc’s operation at Hopelands has attracted five charges of wilful and serious environmental harm with the state government prosecution alleging gas detected around the wells is affecting residents and farmland.

The company deny all allegations and will find out next month whether the case will go to trial.

In national news…

New Zealand unable to house Nauru refugees due to Australian government’s reluctance

New Zealand says it can’t take in refugees from Nauru and Manus island in 2016 due to reluctance from the Australian government.

The country had offered to accept 300 refugees as part of a two-year deal with Australia that was signed by Julia Gillard three years ago but a spokesperson for New Zealand's immigration minister says Australia had not taken up the offer.

Scott Morrison has previously criticised the deal, calling it a band-aid solution has said the two countries should have focused on border protection rather than resettlement of refugees.

New legislation will allow employees to choose own superannuation fund

The Australian government is set to introduce legislation that will allow all workers to choose their own superannuation fund and is planning to introduce changes when Parliament resumes in February.

Kelly O’Dwyer, the Assistant Treasurer, says 26 percent of workers are not able to choose their superannuation fund due to being bound by enterprise agreements.

The news comes after the release the Royal Commission’s final report last year regarding Trade Union Corruption.

In international news…

Starving Syrian town under siege receives aid

Aid has reached a starving town Madaya, in Syria, that has been under siege for seven months and has seen 28 residents die from hunger over the past month.

Trucks carrying food, water, medical supplies and blankets entered the town yesterday after leaving Damascus and the full aid operation will last for a week.

The town hasn’t received any aid since October and residents have had to resort to extreme measures such as digging through rubbish bins and eating grass.

Papua New Guinea Tuberculosis outbreak worsens

The tuberculosis outbreak in Papua New Guinea has not seen any improvement, with more than 160 people living on Daru island having drug-resistant tuberculosis, which is the highest rate in the world.

The PNG government is yet to fulfill funding for emergency responses and while it was thought that poverty, overcrowding and bad travelling conditions were worsening the outbreak, researchers are worrying there is a superbug affecting people, stemming from a bacterial problem rather than environmental.

The Australian-funded tuberculosis ward on the island is full and unable to accept any new patients.