Eastern Quoll rediscovered on mainland - And more 11am Zedlines...

There is hope the eastern quoll, thought to have disappeared from the Australian mainland more than 50 years ago, might still be surviving in New South Wales, after a specimen was recently discovered in Gloucester. (image source: ABC News)

In local news…

Election signs are causing controversy

More election signs are popping up multiple times on the side of the road, billboards and vehicles than has occurred in previous years.

According to Logan City’s deputy mayor Russell Lutton, people probably wouldn’t know there was an election if it weren’t for the signs. One councillor pointed out, if a business put up as many signs as some candidates have done they would be fined.

Fortunately for the candidates, but unfortunately for the public, it’s open slather on signage because there’s no longer any limit on how many each candidates can have.

 

Govt rejects Beattie's asset leases call

Queensland's Labor government won't be selling or leasing public assets, despite a call from party elder Peter Beattie.

But Treasurer Curtis Pitt has said if assets are sold the long-term income generation that goes with it is also sold, creating a short-term windfall but it loses in the long-run.

Mr Pitt also says voters made it crystal clear at the last election that they want assets kept in public ownership, and Mr Beattie's comments change nothing.

 

In national news…

 

Eastern Quoll rediscovered on mainland

There is hope the eastern quoll, thought to have disappeared from the Australian mainland more than 50 years ago, might still be surviving in New South Wales, after a specimen was recently discovered in Gloucester.

The taxidermy specimen, first picked up as roadkill in the Barringtons in 1989, was presented to the Gloucester National Parks and Wildlife Service by a resident. DNA testing on the deceased animal showed it was an eastern quoll, which had last been identified on the mainland in 1963.

Dr Todd Soderquist from the Office of Environment and Heritage says it is a very exciting discovery and records from the past 40 years will now be reassessed.

 

Prime Minister saddened in recount of story

In his first sit-down TV interview with National Indigenous Television, the Prime Minister was brought to tears while telling the story of an elderly indigenous woman.

The Prime minister told the SBS the woman was a very old lady who remembers her mother singing a lullaby to her in the dying Ngunnawal language. He said what was sad to him, was to imagine how the mother was at the time losing her culture.

Turnbull heard of the woman whilst researching a passage in the Ngunnawal language for his Closing the Gap address earlier this month, where he pledged $20 million dollars in funding for language preservation programs.

 

In international news…

Clashes as France starts destroying ‘Jungle’ migrant camp

CLASHES broke out between French riot police and migrants on Monday as authorities began destroying makeshift shelters in the grim shantytown, prompting Police to start lobbing tear gas at revellers, in the town of Calais also known as the “Jungle”.

As night fell some 150 migrants threw rocks and struck vehicles heading for England on a port road which runs next to the sprawling camp, staying there for an hour or so, some wielding iron bars, reported the Agency France Press.

The demolition of the southern half of the camp began after a court petition by charities to stop it was rejected last week. Volunteers and aid workers have spent months trying to improve conditions in the camp, built on a former toxic waste dump on the outskirts of Calais.