HURRICANE IRMA PROMPTS MIAMI ZOO ANIMALS TO TAKE REFUGE

Florida animals from Zoo Miami have seen a change in scenery since the arrival of Hurricane Irma.  

The zoo has relocated smaller fragile animals such as Pink flamingoes to concrete bunkers, which is an upgrade from previous hurricanes, where flamingoes found themselves locked in toilet blocks for protection.

Zoo Miami spokesman Ron Magill says the Zoo is as ready as they can be and that workers have scrambled to secure animals and finish testing emergency equipment.

Larger animals including elephants, lions and apes have not been evacuated, but their enclosures have been heavily fortified.

NEW JOBS ARE SET TO BOOST QUEENSLAND'S ECONOMY 

Billions of dollars in investment and thousands of new jobs are set to boost Queensland’s economy over the next five years.

A new report from the Australian Defence Force shows that investments in the Amberley Air Force base will bring 1.2 billion dollars to the Greater Brisbane economy between 2019-2022.

Almost 1 billion dollars in infrastructure projects have already been delivered by Amberley base in the last decade, which has also seen Ipswich employment grow by almost 25 per cent.

The report estimates that, by 2020, the base could create 7000 jobs both directly and indirectly for local workers.

BRISBANE VOLUNTEERS CALL ON GOVERNMENT TO TURN DOWN 1 BILLION ADANI LOAN

Brisbane volunteers campaigning to stop the Adani coal mine have called on the Federal and Queensland governments to turn down a $1 billion loan from the Northern Australian Infrastructure Facility to the mining company.

The Stop Adani Alliance has now been joined by 29 organisations, including Sea Shepherd, and the Alliance now represents over 2 million Australians.

The Alliance is gearing up for a national day of action on October 7

RESEARCHERS TRIAL NEW TREATMENTS TO STOP MELANOMA FROM SPREADING

Researchers at the Melanoma Institute Australia have successfully trialled new treatments to stop the disease from spreading.

Two trials were conducted by the researchers, both of which proved successful in preventing the spread of disease in stage three melanoma patients whose tumours had been removed.

Professor Grant McArthur, executive director of the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, says that these results could lead to a reduction in the total mortality from melanoma for the first time.

NBL OWNER WANTS TO USE THE LEAGUE TO SPOTLIGHT SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES

The owner of Australia’s National Basketball League is interested in using his public voice as the head of the league to encourage debate and discussion on social justice issues.

Successful businessman, passionate same-sex marriage supporter, and owner of the NBL, Larry Kestelman, is aware of the power an organisation like the NBL can have in sparking public debate.

Kestelman is in the process of sending out surveys to players, officials, and fans to find out what issues they are most passionate about.

He says he has to be careful to ensure he isn’t giving the impression that the league will become a mouthpiece for his own personal beliefs.

9/11 FIRST RESPONDERS STILL STRUGGLE 16 YEARS ON 

On the 16th anniversary of the September 11 terror attacks, the first responders from emergency services are still suffering from the effects of trauma and survivor’s guilt.

A total of 7,000 first responders are listed on the World Trade Centre health registry with an illness directly relating to the 2001 attacks, which include post traumatic stress disorder as well as physical illnesses stemming from that day.

The 9/11 attacks resulted in the deaths of 3,000 people with around 55,000 emergency calls being made.