Animals

Science savvy kids and more Zedlines

Citizen science raised to new heights, with kids signing up to help document Australian species in app ‘Atlas Living Australia’.

Wildlife spotter aims to make science fun while adding to a national database of Australian species. 

Children take and upload photos identifying their finds and those made by others.

Australian University evolution ecologist Professor Craig Moritz says “it actually gets kids out in the real world getting interested in our biodiversity."

 

 

A strategy to strengthen the future of volunteering

A street artist paints a powerful anti-Adani mural on the wall of the Greens Office in New Farm and more Zedlines

The painting depicts Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk holding a gun pointed at Nemo, from Disney’s Finding Nemo, with “REEF KILLER” written next to it.

 Sydney artist Scott Marsh says he is absolutely disgusted by the Adani Carmichael mine, and vowed to continue producing Adani-inspired artworks.

 

 

Queensland in full swing for National Reconciliation Week.

Infrastructure and public spaces in Brisbane are lighting up to create awareness  for National Reconciliation and will be lit until June 3.

Brisbane City Council has released a ‘green, clean sustainable report’, aiming to make Brisbane a global top-10 lifestyle city by 2031 and more Zedlines 

The plan outlines a boost in public transport and cycling, reduction of carbon emissions and improvement of natural habitats and urban forests. 

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk labelled the plan as the council's most ambitious environmental agenda in the city's history - while Council's opposition leader Peter Cumming said the plan was a PR document lacking substance. 
 
The 87 page document cost more than $30 000 to produce. 
 

 

A private vet has confirmed a case of  Hendra virus in a pony paddock in the Gold Coast Hinterland. 
 
The infected pony was not vaccinated against the disease, and was later euthanised.

The moths have it... better listeners make for better partners and more zedlines

University of Melbourne researchers have found that Charles Darwin’s theory that a female’s choice of mate could drive the evolution of mating signals in males may well be correct. Picture source: flickr

Almost 150 years after Charles Darwin first proposed his theory of sexual selection, University of Melbourne researchers have found that male moths with larger antennae are better at detecting female signals in order to ‘win’ the competition of mating success.

Professor Elgar said their results show that females may have a significant and largely unrecognised role in the sexual selection of the elaborate antennae of moths.

Proposal to reintroduce Dingoes and other Zedlines

Reintroducing dingoes to areas they have previously inhabited could be the key to controlling feral cats and red foxes.

The Department of Agriculture estimates damage caused by foxes costs the government up to $227 million each year, and these predators are responsible for the extinction of at least 20 native animals.

A recent study fronted by Thomas Newsome of Deakin University suggests dingoes could drive off the feral foxes and cats while not posing the same risk to endangered animals.

Online delivery hurting small business

Small regional business is struggling to compete with supermarket online delivery services, according to business owners across Queensland.

Dugong Numbers Rise in the Great Barrier Reef

Research from Sydney’s James Cook University has shown dugong calf populations in the Great Barrier Reef have made a comeback after they were wiped out due to their seagrass food supply being damaged from Cyclone Yasi and the subsequent flooding in 2011.

In a survey, scientists estimated that there are more than 5500 dugongs in the Queensland and New South Wales region, over half of which were in The Reef’s world heritage area.

Thriving dugong numbers can be an indicator of good ecosystem health as they play an integral ecological role in The Reef, but further surveys will be conducted every 5 years to monitor the marine animals’ progress.

 

Queen Street Bus Station Renovations

Queensland man dies on Mt. Everest and more Zedlines

A fifty-four year old Australian man dies while descending Mt. Everest.

The Tibet Mountaineering Association says the climber died at seven thousand five hundred feet after suffering from altitude sickness.

The man, named Francesco Marchetti, from Mackay, Queensland, appeared to be an experienced climber.

Mackay Mayor Greg Williamson says he had known Frank for over 30 years, and his death is devastating news.

Rockhampton and Cairns to trial rooftop solar on public housing.

Young girl escapes an aggressive sea lion and more Zedlines

A sea lion has dragged a young girl underwater in Vancouver.

The girl was sitting on the edge of a dock with a crowd of onlookers watching the sea lion, when it reached up and grabbed her by her dress, pulling under.

A man believed to be a relative of the girl jumped in after her, bringing her back to safety. She appeared unharmed.

 

Over the next two weeks more than 2600 Year 9 students will gather across Australia for Young Leader’s ‘Altitude Day’ series.

The series is a two-week national roadshow that celebrates the positive change that young people are able to make in the world.

Koala population more than halved in Queensland and more Zedlines

Koalas could soon be wiped out in areas across QLD due to land clearing, according to a recent report from World Wildlife Foundation Australia.

The report estimated nearly 180 koalas died as a result of bushland bulldozing in south east Queensland alone between 2013 and 2015.

There has been a 53 per cent decline in Queensland koala populations, and an 80 per cent decline in populations in southwest Qld.

The group has called upon the government to “bite the bullet” and put in stronger protections for Koalas and other wildlife.

 

A team of Indigenous rangers is undergoing training to use drones to monitor the health of the Great Barrier Reef.

Astromers believe we live in a parallel universe!? and more Zedlines...

Astronomers have found what they believe is proof we are living in a parallel universe. Image source: Pexels

Since the beginning of time, people have pondered the notion of the multiverse; where an infinite number of universes exist, all with differing realms and dimensions.

New research from the Royal Astronomical Society has focused on a ‘Cold Spot’ in the Cosmos, a ‘cool’ patch of space in the radiation of the universe after its formation.

Durham University researcher, Tom Shanks said this cold spot could essentially be a gap in the multiverse and could have been caused by a collision between our universe and another bubble universe.

 

Pages