Human Rights

Asylum seekers testify at Manus Inquiry

Four asylum seekers will today appear before the Manus Island human rights inquiry to give evidence regarding the terrible living conditions at the detention centre.

The inquiry, initiated by Judge David Cannings, has been commissioned after last month’s deadly riot, and will examine whether conditions at the detention centre comply with international human rights agreements.

Judge Cannings visited the detention centre yesterday, describing the atmosphere as ‘very tense’ and finding little space for exercise, cramped dormitories and not overly clean dining facilities.

Putin Proclaims Crimea a Sovereign State

Following up on the situation in Crimea, despite the sanctions made by the US, Eu and Canada Putin has recognised Crimea independent, after they voted to leave the Ukraine and join Russia.

President Obama says that this is a clear provocation and will lead to further sanctions and the isolation of Russia. Russian troops currently occupy the peninsula and they allegedly plan to nationalize all ukrainian property there.

Venezuelan Anti-Government Protests Escalates

The month long anti-government protests in Caracas-Venezuela has escalated again over the weekend after the government utilised security forces and combat troops to break through barricades the protesters built.

Minister Miguel Rodriguez Torres has stated that his goal was to maintain peace and control. Today the number of deaths has risen to 29 people. The protesters have been protesting against President Nicolas Maduro due to the food-shortages, crimes and the presence of cuban advisors in the government.

Asylum Seeker Failed to Find Safe Haven

For the first time an asylum seeker stopped by Australian authorities and sent back to Indonesia in a life boat has talked about his ordeal.

Mr Arash Sedigh, an iranian asylum seeker, described how it was the second time he had tried and failed to reach Australia and claims he was mistreated by officers. Immigration Minister, Scott Morrison says officers working under the Border Protection Command are well trained and act in accordance with protocol and procedure.

Car bomb attack in Libyan military academy

In eastern Libya two car bombs have exploded at a military academy, the first killing eight soldiers and injuring over a dozen people and the second killing another person.

So far no group has claimed responsibility for the bombing, which has been treated as an act of terrorism by the local government.

IN recent time no individuals or groups have taken any credit for the assassinations or bombings that have happened in the country.

Since the fall of dictator Gaddafi’s regime in 2011, Libya has been the center of unrest and numerous acts of terrorism.

UN publishes Human Right Report on North Korea

China has massively criticized the UN’s Human Rights Report on North-Korea.

The report which was authorized by Australian Judge Michael Kirby compares the country’s current situation to that of Nazi-Germany.
It furthermore states that due to the atrocities committed, the country's Leader Kim Jong Un should be tried for Crimes Against Humanity.
The chinese counsellor Chen Chuandong says these accusations have no foundation and China will continue to support North Korea.
Government officials in North Korea retaliated by stating that other countries like the US should be investigated for their abuse of Human Rights

Asylum seeker murderers to be charged

Manus Island police have announced they are close to charging several men with the murder of Iranian asylum seeker Reza Berait.

Mr Berait died during a riot at the island’s detention centre on the 17th February in which 62 others were also injured.

The revelation comes after an account recorded by Fairfax where two victims were blinded and another machete victim was cut so much as if they meant to cut his head off.

NT considering legislation for unborn children

The Northern Territory has announced it is considering legislation on the rights of the unborn child, which could result in pregnant women being prosecuted for drinking dangerously.

NT Attorney-General John Elferink has labeled the large number of children growing up with foetal alcohol syndrome a real problem.

Mr Elferink said that they would either prosecute or restrain women from engaging in conduct that could endanger the unborn child.

Deportation of a four year old girl

The federal government has prepared to deport a four-year-old Australian-born girl less than a week after her Korean mother broke up with her Australian father.

The Australian grandparents of Ari Illingworth have implored Immigration Minister Scott Morrison to allow their granddaughter, who is an Australian citizen, to stay in Australia with her mother.

Ari, who has just started Prep, is due to leave the country after next Monday with her mother, Eunsil Park, who no longer has a legal right to remain in the country.

Mr Illingworth, Ari’s grandfather, worries that Ari and her mother will be discriminated against when they return to South Korea, where single parenthood is still stigmatised.

Mr Morrison's office has declined to comment.

Syrian children in desperate need

A new report by UNICEF revealed up to one million Syrian children are living under siege and more than five million are in need - double the number of last years report.

Three million Syrian children have had their education disrupted and more than one million have been forced to flee the country, since the civil war began four years ago.

UNICEF officials say these children are "cut off from aid, living in rubble and struggling to find food with many children left without protection, medical care or psychological support.”

The report says the conflict in Syria’s has made the country the most dangerous place in the world to be as a child.

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